Sunday, January 1, 2012

1855 - 1899

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1860 - Sullivan County, Missouri Census

4,5 Surname, First Name
6,7,8 Age, Sex, Occupation
9,10 Value of Real Estate, Value of Personal Estate
11 State, Territory or Country of Birth
12,13,14 Married in Year, School in Year, Illiterate


Bartlett, Solomon 34 M Farmer 3880 1052 KY 001 (Son of Hugh )
Bartlett, Elizabeth 29 F KY 001 (Wife of Solomon)
Bartlett, Harmon 11 M KY 010 (Son of Solomon)
Bartlett, Hugh 9 M KY 010 (Son of Solomon)
Bartlett, John 7 M KY 010 (Son of Solomon)
Bartlett, Nancy 5 F MO 010 (Dtr of Solomon)
Bartlett, Leah 2 F MO 000 (Dtr of Solomon)
Payne, Jordan 26 M Farmhand 350 KY 010 (Cousin of Elizabeth)

Pg. 1Pg. 2.
Actual 1860 Sullivan County, Missouri Census Image

Solomon’s Family is last entry on pg. 1 and continues on pg. 2

Solomon Bartlett (1828 – 1865) (Son of Hugh)

Solomon and family traveled nearly 600 miles from Monroe County, Kentucky to Sullivan County, Missouri along with several other families from Kentucky around 1855. A distance that would take us about 10 hours by car in air conditioned comfort would’ve taken months for these pioneers depending upon the weather and many other factors. They would have traveled only about 10 miles on a good day and only 1-2 miles on a bad one. The Bartlett family’s wagon was pulled by 6 oxen, 2 oxen were led and they also drove loose cattle along the way. The wagon held all of their belongings so the family would have walked alongside the wagon during most of the trip. Elizabeth carried all the family’s money sewn into her skirt. According to Ralph (Solomon's grandson) Solomon purchased 540 acres at $1.25 an acre. Once they arrived their work was far from done. They built a log home, livestock stable, dug a well, a cellar and put up a split-rail fence. The land was cleared and crops were planted. By 1860 just ten years since the last census and five years since they arrived in Missouri, Solomon had increased the value of his landholdings from a total $400 in 1850 while in Kentucky, to a total of $3880 in 1860 with his new homestead in Missouri. He also was able to hire Jordan Payne (cousin of wife Elizabeth) as a farmhand who also lived with the family. Solomon’s sons Harmon, Hugh, John and daughter Nancy had started school and I’m sure their new surroundings were finally starting to feel like home.

Unfortunately, at this time in history, tensions were mounting between the Northern and Southern states. This would soon boil over and lead to events that would forever change Solomon’s family. Solomon was raised in a county in Kentucky that would prove to be strongly sympathetic towards the North in the coming conflict. In the history I’ve researched so far, no Bartlett in our family line had ever owned slaves. In fact, in Monroe County, Kentucky, only 5% of residents owned slaves at all. When the war broke out, 801 men in Monroe County had joined the Union, while only 30 had joined the Confederacy. I mention this to illustrate that even if Solomon had never moved to Missouri, he would still have claimed allegiance to the North. This conflict was about much more than slavery, however. It was also about bringing the nation back to some semblance of order. Missouri especially had become an increasingly lawless area and protecting ones family and the quality of life that they had worked so hard to obtain had became more and more of a priority. Action had to be taken to ensure that things would not devolve even further and this would soon involve the direct participation of the everyday citizens of the state of Missouri including Solomon.

Guerilla warfare erupted on an unprecedented scale in 1862. Though nominally Union-held, much of Missouri remained a vast no-man's land. It was tenuously controlled by small military outposts. The very conditions that created the need for more troops left many able-bodied potential fighting men unwilling to leave their homes and families for volunteer service elsewhere. The provisional state government won authorization that spring for the Missouri State Militia--Federally-funded units to fight only within the state. While the MSM contributed actively to the course of the war its members nevertheless found themselves fighting far from their homes and the guerilla problem persisted. In July, the state government determined to enroll all residents fit for military service into a new Enrolled Missouri Militia. The EMM organized under General Order No. 19. The state would fund the EMM, which would be subject to the call of the governor. However, it would take its orders from the regular Federal military. Members would continue to pursue their civilian lives, contributing such service as would be needed, sometimes for months at a time. There were a total of eighty-nine such regiments.
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GENERAL ORDER NO. 19
HDQRS. MISSOURI STATE MILITIA,

Saint Louis, Mo., July 22, 1862.

An immediate organization of all the militia of Missouri is hereby ordered, for the purpose of exterminating the guerrillas that infest our State.

Every able-bodied man capable of bearing arms and subject to military duty is hereby ordered to repair without delay to the nearest military post and report for duty to the commanding officer. Every man will bring with him whatever arms he may have or can procure and a good horse if he has one.

All arms and ammunition of whatever kind and wherever found, not in the hands of the loyal militia, will be taken possession of by the latter and used for the public defense. Those who have no arms and cannot procure them in the above manner will be supplied as quickly as possible by the ordinance department.

.The militia-men who shall assemble at any post will be immediately enrolled and organized into companies, elect their officers, and be sworn into service, in accordance with the militia laws of the State, under the immediate superintendence of the commanding officer of the post. The militia thus organized will be governed by the Articles of War and Army Regulations, and will be subject to do duty under the orders of the commanding officers of the post where they are enrolled, or such other officers of the United States troops or Missouri Militia, regularly mustered into service, as may be assigned to their command.


Commanding officers will report from day to day, by telegraph, when practicable, the progress of enrollment at their posts and the number of arms required.
Six days after the date of this order are allowed for every man fit for military duty to report to the commanding officer of the nearest military post and be enrolled. All persons so enrolled will be regarded as belonging to the active militia of the State until further orders.


The commanding officer of a post, or any higher commander, is authorized to give furloughs to, such men of this militia force as cannot be absent from their ordinary business without serious detriment or such as are not needed for present service. Such leaves of absence will in no case be for a longer period than ten days, and may be revoked at any time or renewed at their expiration, at the discretion of the officer granting them.

The same strict discipline and obedience to orders will be enforced among the militia in service under this order as among other troops, and commanding officers will be held strictly responsible for all unauthorized acts of the men.
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The enrollment and organization of the militia of Saint Louis will be under the general direction of Col. Lewis Merrill, commanding Saint Louis Division, who will establish rendezvous, appoint enrolling officers, and make such regulations as he shall deem necessary.

By order of Brigadier-General Schofield:

C. W. MARSH,
Assistant Adjutant-General.
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66th EMM (Enrolled Missouri Militia) Headquartered at Hannibal, active around Milan; service in northern Missouri Solomon reported for enrollment as required, to serve in the Enrolled Missouri Militia. Several extensions were given as the deadline to enlist. Solomon eventually enrolled in Milan, Missouri on September 9th, 1862.
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__T.H.E__C.I.V.I.L__W.A.R__

THE YEARS 1864 - 1865. . . .TENNESSEE and ALABAMA
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44th REGIMENT MISSOURI VOLUNTEER INFANTRY
Company E

.On August 1st, 1864, Solomon along with many others, enlisted in the 44th Missouri Volunteer Infantry. This would begin Solomon’s regular war service that would take him outside the state of Missouri to fight for the Union against the Confederate regulars. Addison and Jordan Payne (friends of Solomon and cousins of his wife, Elizabeth) list the same August 1st date in 1864. Solomon also had actively served in the 66th Enrolled Missouri Militia at the same time as Addison and Jordan during parts of 1862 and 1864. They mustered out for active duty on the same day of September 8th, 1864 from Saint Joseph, Missouri. They also served together in the same Company (E).



 
Solomon's Actual Enlistment Papers. Instead of signing his name, he makes his mark (X). 


 
The document above lists some details regarding Solomon's physical features. He is shown to be 5' 8" tall and have dark hair and dark complexion. Eye color is listed as black (?)..

The following entry lists the history of Solomon’s regiment including the dates and locations of the regiment’s movements and engagements.
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ORGANIZED: at St. Joseph, Mo., August 22-September 7, 1864. Attached to District of Rolla, Dept. of Missouri, to November, 1864. Paducah, Ky., Dept. Ohio, November, 1864. Unattached, 23rd Army Corps, Army Ohio, to December, 1864, 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division (Detachment), Army of the Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to February, 1865. 1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 16th Army Corps (New), Military Division West Mississippi, to August, 1865.


SERVICE: Moved to Rolla, Mo., September 14-18, 1864, and duty there till November 5. Expedition from Rolla to Licking November 5.9. Near Licking November 9. Moved to Paducah, Ky., November 12-16, thence to Nashville, Tenn., November 24-27, and to Columbia, Tenn., November 28. Spring Hill November 29. Battle of Franklin November 30…

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The Battle of Franklin
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State: Tennessee
Location: Williamson County
Campaign: Franklin-Nashville Campaign (1864)
Dates: November 30, 1864
Principal Commanders:
Union States: Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield

Confederate States: Gen. John B. Hood
Forces Engaged:
Union States: Combined Forces of the U.S.

Confederate States: Army of Tennessee
Estimated Casualties:
Union States: 2,326 Confederate States: 6,261 Total: 8,587 total
Results: Union victory

Description:Having lost a good opportunity at Spring Hill to hurt significantly the Union Army, Gen. John B. Hood marched in rapid pursuit of Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield’s retreating Union army. Schofield’s advance reached Franklin about sunrise on November 30 and quickly formed a defensive line in works thrown up by the Yankees in the spring of 1863, on the southern edge of town. Schofield wished to remain in Franklin to repair the bridges and get his supply trains over them. Skirmishing at Thompson’s Station and elsewhere delayed Hood’s march, but, around 4:00 pm, he marshaled a frontal attack against the Union perimeter. Two Federal brigades holding a forward position gave way and retreated to the inner works, but their comrades ultimately held in a battle that caused frightening casualties. When the battle ceased, after dark, six Confederate generals were dead or had mortal wounds. Despite this terrible loss, Hood’s army, late, depleted and worn, crawled on toward Nashville..
...Battle of Nashville December 15-16…


. The Battle of Nashville
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State: Tennessee
Location: Davidson County
Campaign: Franklin-Nashville Campaign (1864)
Dates: December 15-16, 1864
Principal Commanders:
Union States: Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas

Confederate States: Gen. John B. Hood
Forces Engaged:
Union States: Combined Forces of the U.S.

Confederate States: Army of Tennessee
Estimated Casualties:
Union States: 2,140 Confederate States: 4,462 Total: 6,602 total
Results: Union victory


Description:
In a last desperate attempt to force Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman's army out of Georgia, Gen. John Bell Hood led the Army of Tennessee north toward Nashville in November 1864. Although he suffered terrible losses at Franklin on November 30, he continued toward Nashville. By the next day, the various elements of Maj. Gen. George H. Thomas's army had reached Nashville. Hood reached the outskirts of Nashville on December 2, occupied positions on a line of hills parallel to those of the Union and began erecting fieldworks. Union Army Engineer, Brig. Gen. James St. Clair Morton, had overseen the construction of sophisticated fortifications at Nashville in 1862-63, strengthened by others, which would soon see use. From the 1st through the 14th, Thomas made preparations for the Battle of Nashville in which he intended to destroy Hood's army. On the night of December 14, Thomas informed Maj. Gen. Henry W. Halleck, acting as Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant's chief of staff, that he would attack the next day. Thomas planned to strike both of Hood's flanks. Before daylight on the 15th, the first of the Union troops, led by Maj. Gen. James Steedman, attacked the Confederate right, pinning down one Rebel corps there for the rest of the day. Attack on the Confederate left on Montgomery Hill did not begin until after noon. With this charge's success, attacks on other parts of the Confederate left commenced, all eventually successful. By this time it was dark and fighting stopped for the day.


Although battered and with a much smaller battle line, Gen. Hood was still confident. He established a main line of resistance along the base of a ridge about two miles south of his former location, throwing up new works and fortifying Shy's and Overton's hills on the flanks. The Federal IV Army Corps marched out to within 250 yards of the Confederate's new line and constructed fieldworks. During the rest of the morning, other Union troops took position opposite the new Confederate line. The same brigade that took Montgomery Hill the day before received the nod for the attack against Overton's Hill. This charge, although gallantly conducted, failed, but other troops (Maj. Gen. A.J. Smith's Israelites") successfully assaulted Shy's Hill in their fronts. Seeing the success along the line, other Union troops charged up Overton's Hill and took it. Hood's army was routed. Thomas had left one escape route open but the Union army set off in pursuit. For ten days, the pursuit continued until the beaten and battered Army of Tennessee re-crossed the Tennessee River. Hood's army was stalled at Columbia, beaten at Franklin, and routed at Nashville. Hood retreated to Tupelo and resigned his command.
...Pursuit of Hood to Columbia and Pulaski December 17-28. Moved to Clifton, Tenn., December 29-January 2, 1865, thence to Eastport, Miss., January 9-11, and duty there till February 6, 1865. Near McMinnville, Tenn., February 5 (Detachment). Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., thence to New Orleans, La., February 6-21. Campaign against Mobile, Ala., and Its defenses March 11-April 12, Expedition from Dauphin Island to Fowl River Narrows March 18-22. Siege of Spanish Fort…
 

The Battle of Spanish Fort


State: Alabama
Location: Baldwin County
Campaign: Mobile Campaign (1865)
Dates: March 27 – April 8, 1865
Principal Commanders:
Union States: Maj. Gen. E.R.S. Canby
Confederate States: Brig. Gen. Randal L. Gibson
Forces Engaged:
Union States: Combined Forces of the U.S.
Confederate States: Spanish Fort Garrison
Estimated Casualties:
Union States: 657 Confederate States: 744 Total: 1,401 total
Results: Union victory


Description:
Maj. Gen. E.R.S. Canby’s XIII and XVI corps moved along the eastern shore of Mobile Bay forcing the Confederates back into their defenses. Union forces then concentrated on Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely. On March 27, 1865, Canby’s forces rendezvoused at Danley’s Ferry and immediately undertook a siege of Spanish Fort. The Union had enveloped the fort by April 1, and on April 8 captured it. Most of the Confederate forces, under the command of Brig. Gen. Randall L. Gibson, escaped and fled to Mobile, but Spanish Fort was no longer a threat.
....and Fort Blakely March 26-April 8. Assault and capture of Fort Blakely April 9….


The Battle of Fort Blakely


State: Alabama
Location: Baldwin County
Campaign: Mobile Campaign (1865)
Dates: April 2 – April 9, 1865
Principal Commanders:
Union States: Maj. Gen. E.R.S. Canby
Confederate States: Brig. Gen. St. John R. Liddell
Forces Engaged:
Union States: Combined Forces of the U.S. Confederate States: Fort Blakely Garrison
Estimated Casualties:
Union States: 629 Confederate States: 2,900 Total: 4,475 (3,529 on April 9th alone)
Results: Union victory


Description:
E.R.S. Canby’s forces, the XVI and XIII corps, moved along the eastern shore of Mobile Bay, forcing the Confederates back into their defenses. Union forces then concentrated on Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely. By April 1, Union forces had enveloped Spanish Fort, thereby releasing more troops to focus on Fort Blakely. Brig. Gen. St. John R. Liddell, with about 4,000 men, held out against the much larger Union force until Spanish Fort fell on April 8, allowing Canby to concentrate 16,000 men for the attack on April 9. Sheer numbers breached the Confederate earthworks compelling the Confederates to capitulate. The siege and capture of Fort Blakely was basically the last combined force battle of the war. African-American forces played a major role in the successful Union assault.
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Battle flag of the 46th Mississippi Infantry captured at Fort Blakely on April 1st, 1865, one day after Solomon is reported to have died of disease.
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Occupation of Mobile April 12. March to Montgomery April 13-25, thence to Tuskegee, and duty there till July 19. Moved to Vicksburg, Miss., thence to St. Louis, Mo., July 19August 4. Mustered out August 15, 1865.

Regiment lost during service 4 Officers and 61 Enlisted men killed and mortally wounded and 5 Officers and 168 Enlisted men by disease. Total 238.
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Source of Data: "A Compendium of the War of the Rebellion, V.III" by Frederick H. Dyer, c1908, p.1337


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Where was Solomon during all of this?

Solomon's experience in battle apparently didn't last very long; in fact he is listed as missing in action during the Battle of Franklin, the very first battle his regiment was engaged in. He then became a prisoner of war for the last four months of his life. The circumstances of his capture and whether or not he was wounded are still unknown. Also unclear is where he was held. There is a story that mentions he may have been imprisoned in Mobile, Alabama for a time before ending up in Montgomery, Alabama, but that has yet to be proven. Regardless of where he was held, the conditions faced by all prisoners of war were deplorable. Overcrowding and the lack of sanitation contributed to the spread of disease. Medical attention was seldom given and was largely ineffective since there was still much that was unknown regarding proper treatment. He also would not have likely been treated in a hospital since only Confederate soldiers and those loyal to the South would have been given priority.

The large number of prisoners combined with the lack of resources of the Confederacy resulted in many dying while captive. Solomon is listed as one of the many who died of disease during the war with Yellow Fever as the alleged cause of death according to my great-grandfather Ralph. This disease would have claimed his life within one to two weeks of his contracting the mosquito-borne virus. Documents recently provided to me however list the cause as Chronic Diarrhea. This could have been due to Cholera or another underlying medical condition and would have caused his death by dehydration. This was just one of many types of sickness faced by soldiers at this time. More men had died from disease in his regiment than from combat by more than 2 to 1. In fact, it is estimated that the same ratio of deaths by disease to deaths in battle existed for the 530,000+ who died during the Civil War. Other estimates I’ve read place it closer to 3 to 1. Solomon would have faced a very hard death. He is reported to have died on March 31st, 1865 in Montgomery, Alabama. Only nine days later, Robert E. Lee would surrender at Appomattox Court House in Virginia, thus ending the war.
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These Muster Rolls from Solomon's Regiment show him reported as missing in action on November 30th, 1864 during the Battle of Franklin and as dying as a prisoner of war in Montgomery, Alabama on March 31st, 1865. Also included below is an affidavit from Captain Webb of Company E confirming the details of Solomon's service.



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The following article titled "War Letter Written 60 Years Ago by Former Milan Man" was from a letter written by Dennis Ryan of the 44th Reg. MO Volunteer Infantry on May 4th, 1865. It was discovered among old letters by a relative of the recipient and later published by the Milan Standard newspaper in 1926. I found this among some old letters that belonged to my great-grandfather Ralph. As you will read, It mentions Solomon's grave, as his regiment came upon it while marching through Montgomery, Alabama. The Mrs. D. A. Payne mentioned is Solomon's daughter Nancy.
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.The Union prisoners who died in Montgomery were originally buried in the city of Montgomery and then were moved to Marietta, Georgia at the city of Montgomery’s request. Montgomery city officials didn’t want Union soldiers to remain buried within their city limits. The soldiers were eventually disinterred and moved more than 175 miles to the Northeast, to be reburied at the Marietta National Cemetery in Georgia. I have been unable to locate any record of Solomon’s actual burial site, so I would have to assume that he would possibly be included among the thousands of unidentified Union soldiers buried in Georgia at the National Cemetery. The cemetery was accepted as a National Cemetery in 1866 and was to contain the graves of both Union and Confederate dead, however, Marietta officials did not want Confederate dead to be buried near Yankee dead, so they formed a separate Confederate Cemetery. Over the next 3 years Union soldiers were disinterred from all over the region and re-interred at the Marietta National Cemetery. These men had been buried with wooden grave markers and by 1869, when the last group was transferred; many of the markers and the names were gone. Over 17,000 men are buried there, more than 3,000 of them unknown.

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.Addison and Jordan Payne would both return home and become county judges and successful businessmen. Addison was also a bank president and owned a considerable amount of land in the county. He was very prominent in politics as a Democrat. Addison Payne would eventually pass away in Milan, Missouri in 1906 at the age of 76.


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Solomon Bartlett
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Documents showing Solomon’s service in the E.M.M. and the 44th Regiment Volunteer Infantry, Company E.
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The above documents show Addison Payne and Jordan Payne’s service in the same units as Solomon. Jordan has his first name spelled several different ways (Jordan, Jord and Gordon) in several records. The Payne family had settled in Sullivan County, Missouri from Monroe County, Kentucky along with the Bartlett’s. And as mentioned earlier, Addison and Jordan Payne were cousins of Solomon's wife Elizabeth.

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The following documents show a pension filed December 4th, 1865 for Solomon’s service in the war. A clearer image was unavailable for the above document. Below shows a document that matches the pension application and certificate numbers with the above document. It also clearly confirms Solomon's correct regiment and company and that this pension was filed for "our" Solomon Bartlett, as there were other Solomon Bartlett's who had also fought in the war.
 
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.Many thanks to Jim Stroud of Virginia, another distant cousin who was so kind to provide copies of many of these documents regarding Solomon in the Civil War as well as some other items. His assistance is much appreciated and his information has helped to make this history even more complete than I could have hoped .
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Sullivan County was organized February 14, 1845, from Linn County and named for James Sullivan, a Revolutionary War general. Originally defined by the Legislature as Highland County on February 17, 1843, the name was changed upon actual organization.


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1860’s IN HISTORY
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PRESIDENT: James Buchanan (1857 - 1861), Abraham Lincoln (1861 - 1865), Andrew Johnson (1865 – 1869)
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EVENTS: Kansas becomes the 34th state (January 29th, 1861), American Civil War (April 12th, 1861 - April 9th, 1865), President Lincoln assassinated (April 15th, 1865), First Transcontinental Railroad completed (May 9th, 1869).

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1870 - Sullivan County, Missouri Census
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4,5 Surname, First Name
6,7,8 Age, Sex, Occupation
9,10 Value of Real Estate, Value of Personal Estate
11 State, Territory or Country of Birth
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Smith, Liberty R. 56 M Farmer 5200 1833 KY (Husband of Elizabeth)
Smith, Elizabeth 39 F KY Wife of Liberty R. Smith (Widow of Solomon)
Bartlett, Harmon J. 21 M KY (Son of Solomon)
Bartlett, John 17 M KY (Son of Solomon)
Bartlett, Nancy I. 14 F MO (Dtr of Solomon)
Bartlett, Laura S. 11 F MO (Dtr of Solomon)
Bartlett, Addison 8 M MO (Son of Solomon)

Bartlett, James S. 6 M MO (Son of Solomon).


.Actual 1870 Sullivan County, Missouri Census Image -

(Liberty R. Smith now head of family with his marriage to Elizabeth (Braden), Solomon’s widow. The family census entry starts on line 26.) Note: Harmon J. appears spelled as Rodman J. Also, Leah L. from 1860 census is now listed as Laura S. on 1870 census. She is a daughter of Solomon and Elizabeth.

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Elizabeth (Braden) Bartlett
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With the death of Solomon in the Civil War, Elizabeth (Solomon’s widow) is left to keep the family together. Harmon, Solomon’s oldest son was just 16 when Solomon died and no doubt, it was left to him and his brother Hugh (14) to do much of the physical labor on the farm. The hardships faced by Elizabeth would’ve been tremendous. She now was raising seven young children on her own, grieving the loss of her husband and trying to maintain the family farm. She was forced to sell off much of the original 540 acres Solomon had purchased when they first arrived in Missouri in 1855 to provide for the needs of the family. Elizabeth deserves much respect and admiration for keeping the family together during this extremely difficult time and should be considered as one of our family heroes. It should also be noted that 240 acres of the original 540 were later purchased at different times by Solomon and Elizabeth’s son’s Hugh and Addison. Addison would farm and raise his family on that very same land from 1904 until 1938.

As is shown in the 1870 census, Elizabeth did carry on and eventually re-married four years after Solomon had passed to Liberty R. Smith. Liberty (56) was 17 years older than Elizabeth (39) and also a native of Kentucky. I’m sure it was a great relief to have someone to take some of the responsibility from her to provide for the family. Addison Bartlett, next of our family patriarchs was born in 1862 and was only 3 years old when his father, Solomon had died. According to Ralph, Addison's son, his only recollection of his father was a brief moment of Solomon trying to get him to laugh while playing with him on the floor. Addison had a younger brother James, who was two years younger. They would eventually have a younger half-sister, Elizabeth Smith and half-brother, Oscar Payne Smith.

In April of 1871, Elizabeth, now married to Liberty Smith transferred the legal guardianship of her four youngest children she had with Solomon (Nancy, Leah, Addison and James) to her cousin, Addison Payne. I’m unsure of the exact circumstances of this arrangement, but it was obviously for financial reasons. Addison would become a very prominent businessman and the Bartlett family were still in the process of recovering from the difficulties caused by Solomon’s passing. In addition to Addison Payne being a cousin to Elizabeth, he had also been longtime friends with Solomon. They had known each other from their early years in Monroe County, Kentucky and served together in the Civil War. Solomon’s son, Addison Bartlett had also been named after him, so there was a close relationship between these two particular families already established. Sometime before the 1880 census, Liberty R. Smith dies, leaving Elizabeth as a widow for the second time.


The following documents show Addison Payne as the legal guardian of Nancy, Leah, Addison and James Bartlett and that the children were due an Army Pension as a result of the death of their father, Solomon.

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The Bartlett's and The Payne's

The Bartlett’s and the Payne’s shared a long history as friends and family going back to their families’ histories in Kentucky. Reuben Payne, a native of Virginia settled in Kentucky and was a contemporary of John Bartlett. Reuben was born in Virginia (1750) and was shown to have lived in Sullivan County, Tennessee. This county was at one time part of Virginia and North Carolina before becoming a part of the state of Tennessee in 1796. Reuben married Elizabeth Sweatman around 1776 and eventually made his way to Monroe County, Kentucky in the early 1800’s, where he eventually died in 1845. Reuben had several sons. One of whom was named Daniel Thompson Payne.

Daniel (born in 1780) was about the same age as Solomon Bartlett, son of John Bartlett. Daniel T. Payne married Martha Frazier and they eventually had 13 children, 6 girls (Isaphenia, Elizabeth, Mary, Nancy, Isabel and Rachel) and 7 boys (Daniel, Benjamin, Enoch, John, Henry, James and Reuben). Nancy Payne married William Braden. Their daughter, Elizabeth married Solomon Bartlett (grandson of Solomon Bartlett). Enoch Payne married Mary Bartlett (daughter of Solomon Bartlett and Rosannah (McMurtry). There are several other Bartlett/Payne unions as well. Researching family alliances such as this could eventually lead to finding out more about our early family origins (before our time in Kentucky). These Bartlett/Payne connections have been verified through multiple sources as well as through correspondence I’ve had directly with Janet Horton-Payne, who is the great-great granddaughter of Addison Payne and lives in Oregon. I’m very thankful to her for her kindness, assistance and enthusiasm.


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America Elizabeth Bartlett (Payne) and Hugh Marshall Bartlett
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Plat from 1877 showing 80 acres in name of Hugh Marshall Bartlett


1870’s IN HISTORY

PRESIDENT: Ulysses S. Grant (1869 - 1877), Rutherford B. Hayes (1877 - 1881)

EVENTS: Jules Verne publishes Around the World in 80 Days (1872), The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell., The phonograph is invented in 1877 by Thomas Edison, Continuation of post-Civil War reconstruction until its conclusion under President Rutherford B. Hayes in 1877.

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1880 - Sullivan County, Missouri Census

Smith, Elizabeth F W 49 KY Keeping House (Widow of Solomon and Liberty)

Addison Bartlett M W 18 MO Works on Farm (Son of Solomon and Elizabeth)
James Bartlett M W 16 MO Works on Farm (Son of Solomon and Elizabeth)
Elizabeth Smith F W 9 MO (Dtr of Liberty and Elizabeth)
Oscar P. Smith M W 5 MO (Son of Liberty and Elizabeth)
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Actual 1880 Sullivan County, Missouri Census Image - (Elizabeth's family entry starts on line 5.).

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1880 - Stafford County, Kansas Census
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Bartlett, John 26 M Farmer KY (Son of Solomon and Elizabeth Bartlett)
Bartlett, Dorotha 22 F IA (Wife of John Bartlett)
Bartlett, Harmon 3 M MO (Son of John and Dorotha Bartlett)
Bartlett, Elie 1 F KS (Dtr of John and Dorotha Bartlett)

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. Actual 1880 Stafford County, Kansas Census Image -

(John Bartlett’s family, first of our Bartlett’s to move to Kansas. The family census entry is 4th on the page.)

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.In 1880, Addison was 18 and his brother James was 16. Harmon, Hugh, John, Nancy and Leah had since left to start their own families. The 1880 census shows Elizabeth as head of the family with her sons Addison and James and their half-sister Elizabeth Smith and half-brother Oscar Payne Smith rounding out the household in Sullivan County, Missouri. We also see that the first of our common Bartlett’s had moved to Kansas. John Bartlett, Solomon & Elizabeth’s third son had moved to Stafford around 1878, the same year the town was founded. There, they had a daughter, Elie. She would have been the first of our Bartlett’s born in Kansas. John and his wife Dorotha (an unrelated Bartlett) also had a son before leaving for Kansas named Harmon, after John’s older brother. Stafford, Kansas will eventually become home to others in the Bartlett family.


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Stafford County, Kansas

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John Bartlett and Dorotha Bartlett


John Bartlett homestead in Stafford County, Kansas

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Meanwhile, back in Sullivan County, Missouri...


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Addison Solomon Bartlett and Mary Frances Halliburton


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The Halliburton Family

.On February 27th, 1887, Addison Bartlett, just about to turn 25, married Mary Frances Halliburton. They start their family soon after with the birth of Ralph Sterling Bartlett on January 16th, 1888. In August of 1889 daughter Orpha is born.
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1880’s IN HISTORY

PRESIDENT: Rutherford B. Hayes (1877 – 1881), James Garfield (1881), Chester Arthur (1881 – 1885), Grover Cleveland (1885 – 1889)

EVENTS: Development and commercial production of electric lighting. The development and commercial production of gasoline-powered automobile by Karl Benz, Gottleib Diamler and Maybach begins. First commercial production and sales of phonographs and phonograph recordings, First steel frame construction "sky-scrapers". Construction Mark Twain publishes The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (1884). About 300,000 Swedes immigrate to the United States. .

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1890 - Sullivan County, Missouri Census

1890 Sullivan County, Missouri Census destroyed by fire in the Commerce Department Building in January 1921

Although the 1890 census for Sullivan County no longer exists, we do know that Addison and Mary continue to add to their family with the births of Earl in 1891, James Erwin in 1893 and Isabel in 1895. James, Addison’s younger brother, marries Malinda Byer in 1891. In the 1900 census, we learn a little about where James’ family was during the 1890’s. Around 1893, they had a son with a familiar name, Harmon. Another son for James follows about 1895. His name is Addison, named after his uncle. This younger Addison shows to have been born in the state of Oklahoma. A daughter, Myrtle is born there as well around 1898.

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The Oklahoma Land Rush

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According to an account in Elizabeth (Smith) Hadwiger's obituary (daughter of Elizabeth Braden and Liberty Smith) she had traveled with her half-brother James Bartlett and his family to Oklahoma to participate in the land rush as Indian land was opened up to settlers. After the first one in 1885 and another in 1889, the largest and best known of these events occurred in 1893 as the Cherokee Strip was opened. At noon September 16, 1893, a shot rang out and more than 100,000 determined settlers raced for 42,000 claims. By sunset, there would be tent cities, endless lines at federal land offices and more losers than winners. The Cherokee Strip Land Run was a tumultuous finale to what some considered the last American frontier. James reportedly staked his claim 5 miles south of Caldwell, Kansas, a town located on the Oklahoma - Kansas border and the starting line for the Cherokee Strip Land Run. He eventually lost his claim however after extended contested litigation. James' family finally settled back in Kansas and had another son, Charles. Stafford County, Kansas would now finally be home to Addison’s younger brother James and his family. Addison and James' older brother John Bartlett would later relocate from Stafford County further west to Ford County, Kansas.

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Elizabeth "Lizzy" (Smith) Hadwiger
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Daughter of Elizabeth (Braden) and Liberty Smith

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Town plat from 1897 showing 280 acres owned by Hugh Marshall Bartlett.

 
The above photo shows 280 acres of the original 540 Solomon purchased in 1855. .

Portions of this family land were owned at various times by brothers Harmon, Hugh and Addison Bartlett. Addison would farm and raise his family on 240 of these acres from 1904 until 1938 according to Ralph's written account (Addison's son) . The location of the Bartlett land was figured by aligning the aerial photo with the town plat using the same scale with Pollock, Missouri as a reference point. The property lines are clearly visible today, even though the plat is from 1897. Located a quarter mile to the east of the property (not marked in the above photo, but shown in the 1897 plat) is a 40 acre farm purchased by Ralph in 1910 from Tolbert Page.
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Addison Solomon Bartlett
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1890’s IN HISTORY

PRESIDENT: Benjamin Harrison (1889 - 1893), Grover Cleveland (1893 – 1897), William McKinley (1897 – 1901)

EVENTS: The Panic of 1893 sets off a widespread economic depression in the United States that lasts until 1896,Spanish-American War (April 25th – August 12th, 1898), H.G. Wells publishes The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896) and The War of the Worlds (1898). Ragtime, the first truly American music genre begins its peak of popularity (1899).


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